Literature review of motivational interviewing

Three previous reviews have examined the efficacy of brief interventions delivered with MI principles. Understanding the influence of these characteristics can help program developers design the most effective interventions and may facilitate larger effect sizes.

Methodological quality score The quality of each study was assessed according to 12 criteria developed by Miller et al. Also, the components of MI should be compared to determine which are most responsible for maintaining long-term changes.

The articles were all current Literature review of motivational interviewing the oldest being and provided a good basis for stronger and more rigorous evidence to be undertaken on the research question.

Their findings revealed the greatest efficacy for MI when it was used to enhance more intensive substance-abuse treatments. The report majorly considers how motivational interviewing leads to increased physical activity and functional exercise capacity in adults with chronic health conditions.

In the use of MI, the nurse and patient together aim to address the following goals: The final category includes people with high levels of dependence who are not reached by conventional treatment services.

For example, the U. However, brief interventions are not suitable for everyone. There may be present methodological limitations of MI for evaluation of technique, but incorporating the use of MI continues to gain popularity in major health systems. We found there is a variety of research available to support the use of MI in health care.

Using a methodological framework adapted from Whittemore and Knafl [15], the purpose of this literature review is to explore current knowledge regarding strategies for evaluating the delivery of MI in the field of nursing.

Is motivational interviewing effective for enabling occupation in adults with chronic diseases? The major benefits to the use of MI include the positive effects on patient outcomes, clinician-patient relationships and patient-centered care, as well as the potential for clinician transformational learning through the use of self-reflection and session analysis.

The articles were all current with the oldest being and provided a good basis for stronger and more rigorous evidence to be undertaken on the research question.

Brief MI is effective. Similarly, it is a client-centered care based on needs identification, linking into more appropriate community services, and advocating where needed.

MI can help to quickly engage the patient to focus on meaningful ways to change health behavior that has great potential to make a difference. Incorporating MI on a consistent basis and on a large scale has the potential to impact patient outcomes, and overall health such as preventing obesity or diabetes, and treating substance abuse.

Rating scales like the MITI have been successfully utilized among multiple cultures as well as in different languages [18]. Additionally, nurses offer brief advice to patients and their families to help understand risk for disease, promote health, prevent disease and complications, as well as answer questions that the patient may have.

In these, the aggregate effect size was 0. There is an additional lack of standardization of training for both clinician and trainer. The objectives of the current study, which updates the previous meta-analytic reviews, were to examine i whether MI is more efficacious than no treatment in reducing alcohol consumption, and ii whether MI is as efficacious as other treatments.

Research shows that clinicians are not well-prepared to influence patients in changing health behavior [5]. Methodological quality score The quality of each study was assessed according to 12 criteria developed by Miller et al.

One example is obesity that can be prevented with the lifestyle behaviors of healthy eating, being physically active, achieving healthy weight, and obtaining adequate sleep each night. For instance, in the case of hazardous drinking, identifying the harmful effects of drinking alcohol can instil the motivation to change.

They are defined as any therapeutic or preventive consultation of short duration one to five sessions undertaken either by a health-care professional, general practitioner, or nurse Aalto et al.TheEffectivenessandApplicabilityofMotivational Interviewing:APractice-FriendlyReview ofFourMeta-Analyses m Brad Lundahl University of Utah m Brian L.

Burke. Interventions Combining Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive Behavior to Promote Medication Adherence: A Literature Review Hilton, Melissa; and Ridenour, Kimberly, "Interventions Combining Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive Behavior to Promote Medication Adherence: A Literature Review" ().

To identify articles for inclusion in this review, we conducted a literature search using the psycINFO, psycARTICLES, Academic Search Premier, and Medline databases. Database search terms used included MI, motivational enhancement therapy, training, education, and workshop.

A motivational interviewing intervention to increase fruit and. Literature Review Motivational Interviewing What is Motivational Interviewing? otivational interviewing (MI) is a form of goal-oriented psychotherapy, in which clinicians help clients overcome their ambivalence or lack of motivation toward changing their behavior in positive ways.

MI is a method of communication, not a set.

Motivational Interviewing for Adolescent Substance Use: A Review of the Literature

An integrative literature review of motivational interviewing and co-active life coaching as potential interventions for positive behaviour change in adolescents. Using a methodological framework, a literature review was performed to explore current knowledge regarding strategies for evaluating the delivery of MI in the nursing field.

The most commonly used tool for the evaluation of intervention was a version of the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) Code (n=7).

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Literature review of motivational interviewing
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